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What's the most exotic thing you've ever eaten?

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Moose
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What's the most exotic thing you've ever eaten?

#1 Postby Moose » August 1st, 2007, 5:06 pm

I am a bit of a coward when it comes to exotic foodstuffs and I've never tried anything very 'far off the beaten track' .. nor would I particularly like to ;). I had partidge or pheasant or something once in a stew and I've tried venison and wild boar (not very inspired by any of these) but nothing more exotic than that. What about the rest of you?
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain
Time to die

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Nick
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#2 Postby Nick » August 1st, 2007, 5:21 pm

Larks' tongues in aspic....only kidding. I'm a coward too. I haven't even had the nerve to try oysters. They look revolting (and to be fair, a lot of sea-food does not agree with me for some reason). I tried a taste of frogs' legs earlier this year, but it didn't look appealing on the plate. I'd rather have chicken.

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Moose
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#3 Postby Moose » August 1st, 2007, 5:23 pm

I've never tried oysters either .. I've no idea how anyone can consider something that looks like that an aphrodisiac. And I believe that they actually used to be considered poor people's food ... these days people pay a fortune for them tho.

I tried a mussel once. Revolting.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain

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Maria Mac
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#4 Postby Maria Mac » August 1st, 2007, 5:36 pm

I love mussels and can eat them by the jar. I don't care for oysters.

I don't think I've eaten anything exotic but some people might consider octopus unusual. My mother used to make it delicious.

I think I had horsemeat in France as a kid but wasn't told until afterwards.

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Moose
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#5 Postby Moose » August 1st, 2007, 5:39 pm

The mussel didn't really taste bad - just tasted of something vaguely meaty in vinegar - but it looked so awful that I was nearly sick :(
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain

Time to die



EF

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Alan C.
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#6 Postby Alan C. » August 1st, 2007, 5:51 pm

I've had shark, not that exotic really :redface: it was OK and I would have it again.
NICK! love your Pugwash. Remember Rodger the cabin boy :laughter:
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Moose
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#7 Postby Moose » August 1st, 2007, 5:52 pm

I'd quite like to try shark .. what does it taste like? I've seen it in the supermarket from time to time.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain

Time to die



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Alan C.
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#8 Postby Alan C. » August 1st, 2007, 5:59 pm

Moose wrote:I'd quite like to try shark .. what does it taste like? I've seen it in the supermarket from time to time.
It's just a little bit stronger tasting than cod really, if you were served it without knowing what it was, you would probably just think it was fish, it's a bit like Hake.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Nick
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#9 Postby Nick » August 1st, 2007, 6:05 pm

Alan C. wrote:NICK! love your Pugwash. Remember Rodger the cabin boy :laughter:
Glad you like it, Alan! I'm quite pleased with myself for having worked out how to put it on the system (I just followed Maria's instructions :grin: ) and I think he conveys just the right amount of uncertainty and vagueness which so infuriated my ex.:sad:

BTW, I don't know which series you were watching:redface: , but in the one I watched with my dad, the cabin boy's name was Tom :halo:

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Alan C.
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#10 Postby Alan C. » August 1st, 2007, 6:13 pm

Sorry my mistake, it was just an urban legend :redface:
Contrary to popular belief, the names of his crew were not particularly smutty. 'Master Bates', 'Seaman Staines' and 'Roger the Cabin Boy' (plus the later addition of 'Simon the Bar Steward') being the names often quoted as proving the programme's dodginess. The Guardian was not the only publication which had to make an apology after printing the story that the BBC had withdrawn the program after finding out the dodgy names. It is a shame, but unfortunately John Ryan did not choose these names. They would have made the program even better, though.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Fia
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#11 Postby Fia » August 1st, 2007, 10:03 pm

Moose – you need to try mussels which aren’t pickled. Fresh mussels with white wine, garlic, seasoning and fresh herbs cooked in a lidded pan….eat the ones which are open. Soak the juice with a baguette. Share with a friend. Bliss!

Dunno why us Brits who eat meat have a thing against horsemeat. Low fat and very tasty. The meat eaters in our house had pheasant the last two end of year dinners. Very Yum.

Have eaten goats brain curry –buttery– but would draw the line at insects unless they were all that kept me from starvation.

But food preferences are surely culturally conditioned. It can be argued that the supermarket culture and lack of understanding of food is removing our involvement and understanding of where food comes from…

Teach kids to cook, and enjoy real food, however weird it may seem I say!

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Goldie
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#12 Postby Goldie » August 1st, 2007, 10:13 pm

I've answered this on another forum and freaked a lot of people out.

Rocky Mountain Oysters (Bull testicles) cooked 'em...love 'em...still do.

Escargot

calamari

oysters (My favorite) all mussles and shellfish (shrimp, lobster, crab...)

crayfish/crawfish/crawdads...whatever you want to call them.

Just about all seafood and fish

caviar

Just about every wild game-bird around

Deer

Elk

Moose

Horse

Bear

(No cougar, yet)

Frog legs

An earth worm when I was 5 yrs old...for a dollar.

Pickled herring

I'll try pretty much anything once... if it is cooked.

I do eat raw oysters and rare AHI Tuna. I like my steaks rare...
I would like to try the world of insects. I hear fried grasshoppers are REALLY good....
I cannot remember everything off of the top of my head
Oh wild mushrooms including brains, morrells, corals and puffer-balls
I saw a wino eating grapes. I said,"Dude, you have to wait." Mitch Hedberg

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Alan C.
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#13 Postby Alan C. » August 1st, 2007, 10:26 pm

Goldie
oysters (My favorite) all mussles and shellfish (shrimp, lobster, crab...)
You do know shellfish are an abomination? Hell for you I'm afraid.
Moose
I know somebody who won't be best pleased.
Pickled herring
A staple where I live. I just wish God hadn't given them so many bloody bones! :laughter:
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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lewist
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#14 Postby lewist » August 1st, 2007, 11:34 pm

Moules Marinieres made with mussels picked off the beach on the Isle of Sanday. Not an experience I have sought to repeat.

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verte
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#15 Postby verte » August 2nd, 2007, 12:56 am

Goldie wrote:An earth worm when I was 5 yrs old...for a dollar.


I used to pay my cousin Ronnie to eat bugs for a quarter. But I drove a hard bargain. It had to be a really big bug for a whole quarter. :nod:
Space for rent, cheap.

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Goldie
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#16 Postby Goldie » August 2nd, 2007, 6:14 am

verte wrote:
Goldie wrote:An earth worm when I was 5 yrs old...for a dollar.


I used to pay my cousin Ronnie to eat bugs for a quarter. But I drove a hard bargain. It had to be a really big bug for a whole quarter. :nod:

:hilarity:
we are so related!!!!

My neighbor boy, Bryant refused to pay me my dollar after I ate a gritty sand filled worm, from our sandbox.
I got pissed off and marched over to his mom and told her the whole story. She slapped him upside the head (not very hard) and made him pay me.
:hilarity:
BRAT! Bryant the BRAT!!!! :halo:
I saw a wino eating grapes. I said,"Dude, you have to wait." Mitch Hedberg

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The ex-Alan
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#17 Postby The ex-Alan » August 2nd, 2007, 10:14 am

Sweetbreads ( Lambs testicles ) Pretty damn good if they aren't overcooked.

Oysters, Calamari, Caviare and Escargot - so many times I can't remember ( I used to be a chef, there's no money in it but you do eat some great food ).

Horse - good stuff.

Impala ( just like African venison - very tasty )

Wart Hog ( gorgeous - just like a York Ham ).

Wildebeast - disapointing

Jellied eels

Mushy peas

Haggis

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whitecraw
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#18 Postby whitecraw » August 2nd, 2007, 10:21 am

Pottit heid. If you ate it in Morocco, it would probably be considered exotic; but it used to be a staple among the Scottish equivalent of poor white trash in bygone rural days. Basically, it’s a sheep’s head, boiled to buggery (or at least until what little flesh there is flakes from the skull), and the meat and gunge poured off into pots and allowed to set. My granny used to make gallons of it, dress the skulls in casts of wool and craw feathers, and sit them on the dyke outside the tractor shed in which she lived. It’s good melted through champit neeps and tatties. What the American’s call ‘soul food’.

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Moose
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#19 Postby Moose » August 2nd, 2007, 12:40 pm

I think you can still get that head stuff .. isn't that known as brawn these days?

I'd prolly try horse. What's it taste like?
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain

Time to die



EF

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Nick
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Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

#20 Postby Nick » August 2nd, 2007, 12:42 pm

Moose wrote:I'd prolly try horse. What's it taste like?

Horse, mainly


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