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Atheist school's values & ethics

For discussions related to education and educational institutions.
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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#261 Postby coffee » August 19th, 2015, 9:46 am

Latest post of the previous page:

Here is another good one (secular grace)


"Steveroot
Nov 28, 2013 at 4:27 pm

That wasn’t meant to be an “offering”… just an observation.
Here’s a Thanksgiving secular grace I cooked up for tonight’s dinner:

We are grateful for the presence of those we love, for all the events and circumstances which have made it possible for us to be here.

We are thankful for this food, for those who planted, grew, provided and prepared it.
We stand in awe-struck gratitude for the countless millions of stars which, by exploding, provided the elements which make up everything we are and all we know.

We hope that, in the fullness of time, all peoples everywhere will have the bounty we are grateful for today.

Amen.
Steve"

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#262 Postby coffee » September 24th, 2015, 10:06 am

Here is some more good stuff



""Living as a Humanist


Humanism as a life stance is comprehensive touching on every part of our lives, for those who call themselves Humanists it provides meaning, purpose and a framework for making ethical life choices. Most Humanists would indentify with at least some of the following principles and elements:


Humanism is a naturalistic philosophy and thus rejects belief in supernatural beings or principles.


Humanists rely on the scientific method, reasoning and critical thinking to form beliefs and opinions. We hold that gaining knowledge is a continuing process reliant upon observation, evaluation and revision.


We uphold the right to individual freedom, autonomy and privacy, so long as the rights of others are respected.


We consider other members of the human family as equal in dignity and value.


We believe we should act in a fair, just and honest way towards others, respecting their right to live peaceful, healthy and productive lives.


Humanists hold that a democratic and secular government is best suited to respecting the pluralistic and diverse nature of our society and fostering individual freedom.


We are committed to the use of reasoned argument and peaceful adjudication in settling conflict.



We oppose discrimination based on gender, sex, race, ethnicity or system of belief.


Many Humanists believe that whenever possible we should endeavour to minimise the suffering of animals.


We recognise the importance of sustaining the natural ecosystem and protecting the biosphere and environment from degradation and destruction.""

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#263 Postby coffee » September 24th, 2015, 10:06 am

Fuck, the computer is too slow so I accidentally click twice.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#264 Postby coffee » December 21st, 2015, 9:29 am

Some more stuff for atheists


http://www.northeast-humanists.org.uk/


Humanists

.Humanists think for themselves about what is right and wrong, based on: reason, logic and clarity of thought, followed by emotional maturity,

the introduction of Critical analysis, Honesty, Dissent, Transparency, Inquiry, Debate, Enquiry, Education and Civility (Respect for others)

.Humanists find meaning, beauty and joy in the one life we have, without the need for an after life

.Humanists look to science not religion as the best way to discover and understand the World, making the World a better place through empathy and

compassion

Humanists welcome everyone, from all communities




http://www.northeast-humanists.org.uk/faqwd/civics/


To create a FUTURE society where Secular Democracy may exist, society and government must change and accept the following:

1) Introduce Reason, Logic and clarity of thought

2) Become emotional mature

3) Introduce Critical analysis, Honesty, Dissent, Transparency, Inquiry, Debate, Enquiry AND Education

4) Introduce Civility in government, removing Incivility as currently across the political spectrum there is a lack of civility and respect,

turning public debates into shouting matches that only encourage more hard feelings and more division




Civility

(Good manners, Civic pride, Consensus, Cooperation, Use Evidence Based Reasoning, Neutral point of view, Information is free to review,

contribute too, Criticise with evidence, References of evidence must be provided, Respect, Follow policies and guidelines that improve the system

with Consensus Decision-Making NOT Group-Think)

Create a society and government that follows: Reason, Logic, clarity of thought, when it becomes Emotional mature this will include Critical

analysis, honesty, dissent, transparency, inquiry, debate, enquiry and education


==========================



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_value

Psychology and the search for universal values

Schwartz's ten types of universal value are: power, achievement, hedonism, stimulation, self-direction, universalism, benevolence, tradition,

conformity, and security. Below are each of the value types, with the specific related values alongside:

.Power: authority; leadership; dominance
.Achievement: success; capability; ambition; influence; intelligence; self-respect
.Hedonism: pleasure; enjoying life

.Stimulation: daring activities; varied life; exciting life
.Self-direction: creativity; freedom; independence; curiosity; choosing your own goals

.Universalism: broadmindedness; wisdom; social justice; equality; a world at peace; a world of beauty; unity with nature; protecting the
environment; inner harmony
.Benevolence: helpfulness; honesty; forgiveness; loyalty; responsibility; friendship

.Tradition: accepting one's portion in life; humility; devoutness; respect for tradition; moderation
.Conformity: self-discipline; obedience
.Security: cleanliness; family security; national security; stability of social order; reciprocation of favours; health; sense of belonging

Schwartz also tested an eleventh possible universal value, 'spirituality', or 'the goal of finding meaning in life', but found that it does not

seem to be recognised in all cultures.[8] Some consider love to be a universal value.[citation needed]



===================


http://chester.humanist.org.uk/?page_id=8


Chester Humanists was founded in August 2005, with the object of promoting Humanists principles, supporting appropriate good causes and providing

a means for like-minded people, in the area of Chester, Wirral and North Wales, to meet and discuss Humanist issues.

What are humanists?

Humanists live by the principle that human beings can lead good lives without religion or belief in the supernatural. We seek to make the best

use of the one life we have by creating meaning and purpose for ourselves, using reason, experience and shared human values.

Humanists believe that you should:

.Live your life on the basis that it is the one life we have, with no expectation of a life to follow if we die and value it the more on that
account.
.Have respect and consideration for the lives and welfare of all in the wider human society of which we are a part.

.Have respect for our planet and all its other life forms.
.Support efforts to eliminate poverty, disease, ignorance and inequality worldwide.

.Hold no opinion without rational consideration of the evidence and do not hesitate to change your opinion, if new evidence requires it.
.Defend freedom of expression, including religious views, in a free society and defend the free interchange of ideas and opinions, without which
human ideals and aspirations cannot thrive.

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coledavis
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#265 Postby coledavis » December 21st, 2015, 12:23 pm

Evidence-based reasoning. Yes. I guess as an atheist, my commitment beyond not believing in religion is to rational thought. Science is, to my way of thinking, a branch of rational thinking.
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Nick
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#266 Postby Nick » December 21st, 2015, 5:05 pm

Humanist websites frequently make reference to equality and to freedom. Are these two ideals actually compatible? Or are they, perhaps, too vague to be useful? Hmmm...

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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#267 Postby coledavis » December 21st, 2015, 6:49 pm

Nick wrote:Humanist websites frequently make reference to equality and to freedom. Are these two ideals actually compatible? Or are they, perhaps, too vague to be useful? Hmmm...
They can be, perhaps, but it certainly isn't an automatic given (if we consider much of the communist experience as truly egalitarian, which is highly arguable in itself).
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#268 Postby coffee » December 22nd, 2015, 9:42 am

Humanist websites frequently make reference to equality and to freedom. Are these two ideals actually compatible? Or are they, perhaps, too vague to be useful? Hmmm...


I agreed Nick, humanists need to widen their values if they want to attract more members. For a start, they would have to include security,
more is on the following lists (minus the religious bits)

http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Unive ... mpathy.pdf
http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Feeli ... mpathy.pdf

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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#269 Postby Alan H » December 31st, 2015, 12:42 pm

Ofsted reveals that a school is six times as likely to remain inadequate if it becomes a sponsored academy
In response to a question from Lord Hunt of Kings Heath, Ofsted has replied with the data on the latest inspections for schools previously rated Inadequate: PQ HL4539 Lord Hunt

For “inadequate” schools that become sponsored academies, 12% remain inadequate (1 in 8) compared to just 2% (1 in 50) of those that remain in the local authority maintained sector.

The Education and Adoption Bill is based on the assumption that the only way to improve schools was to convert to become a sponsored academy and join a Multi Academy Trust. This data casts serious doubt on that assumption.

“There is a general assumption, in the Government and the media, that becoming a sponsored academy is the only way to improve a school,“ commented Lord Hunt. “However this data, from Ofsted, suggest the opposite. A school is far more likely to improve its Ofsted status if it remains in the maintained sector.”
Kevin Courtney, Deputy General Secretary of the National Union of Teachers, the largest teachers’ union, added: “The Government’s whole schools strategy is based on the dogmatic belief that conversion to academy status by definition improves standards. These latest findings show this to be nonsense. It is in fact the proven structural support of maintained schools which is more likely to achieve results. But the Government’s educational vandalism is systematically undermining the role of local authorities in education, to the detriment of our children.”
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#270 Postby coledavis » December 31st, 2015, 1:48 pm

Hi Alan - my thinking is that merely renaming an institution, now that the gleam has gone out of the idea, is unlikely to do much.
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#271 Postby coffee » February 1st, 2016, 10:02 am

There appear to be no major objection to the values on this thread, and that there is something useful for everyone on this thread, that mean

these values could be compiled into a booklet and distribute it as an alternative to the bible for any religious person as well as for

atheists/humanists. Any flaw can be clear up through democracy and open debate or people can work it out with their brain/intelligence. it

is not mean to be perfect (although it aim to) but one that is kinder than any religious book.

Is there a need for this? I would say yes, so that people don't have to send there children to religious school to get these values.

We need to have our own meme and defend it or we have to endure cruel religious meme impose on us and our youngster.


Having no values are not an option because it get most of atheists/humanists to no where.



Is there any view on this, any other useful value to add to the list?





Just updating the links.


http://baynvc.org/list-of-needs/

http://baynvc.org/list-of-feelings/



http://www.cnvc.org/Training/needs-inventory

http://www.cnvc.org/Training/feelings-inventory


http://www.rsablogs.org.uk/wp-content/u ... arrett.pdf



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_humanism

Council for Secular Humanism[edit]
According to the Council for Secular Humanism, within the United States, the term "secular humanism" describes a world view with the following

elements and principles:[8]

1/Need to test beliefs – A conviction that dogmas, ideologies and traditions, whether religious, political or social, must be weighed and tested

by each individual and not simply accepted by faith.
2/Reason, evidence, scientific method – A commitment to the use of critical reason, factual evidence and scientific method of inquiry in seeking

solutions to human problems and answers to important human questions.

3/Fulfillment, growth, creativity – A primary concern with fulfillment, growth and creativity for both the individual and humankind in general.
4/Search for truth – A constant search for objective truth, with the understanding that new knowledge and experience constantly alter our

imperfect perception of it.

5/This life – A concern for this life (as opposed to an afterlife) and a commitment to making it meaningful through better understanding of

ourselves, our history, our intellectual and artistic achievements, and the outlooks of those who differ from us.
6/Ethics – A search for viable individual, social and political principles of ethical conduct, judging them on their ability to enhance human

well-being and individual responsibility.

7/Justice and fairness – an interest in securing justice and fairness in society and in eliminating discrimination and intolerance.[27]
8/Building a better world – A conviction that with reason, an open exchange of ideas, good will, and tolerance, progress can be made in building

a better world for ourselves and our children.



A Secular Humanist Declaration was issued in 1980 by the Council for Secular Humanism's predecessor, CODESH. It lays out ten ideals: Free inquiry

as opposed to censorship and imposition of belief; separation of church and state; the ideal of freedom from religious control and from

jingoistic government control; ethics based on critical intelligence rather than that deduced from religious belief; moral education; religious

skepticism; reason; a belief in science and technology as the best way of understanding the world; evolution; and education as the essential

method of building humane, free, and democratic societies.[28]

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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#272 Postby coffee » March 12th, 2016, 11:05 am

The following values has been refined and consider as tools for humanists & atheists to thrive as an individual or as a community.


None of the following are my work and are/were all found on the internet.

+++++++++++++

"All our beliefs/values are subject to change in the face of new evidence, including these."
"Be open-minded and be willing to alter your beliefs with new evidence."

“Humanism recognises that reliable knowledge of the world and ourselves arises through a continuing process of observation/investigation/research, evaluation and revision.”

+++++++++++++++

I thought humanists/atheists might like these values (see the links below) I know it is not perfect but I hope it is helpful (forget the religious bit)


Feel free to add your other useful values to these list to complement it



http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Unive ... mpathy.pdf

http://www.rsablogs.org.uk/wp-content/u ... arrett.pdf

http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Feeli ... mpathy.pdf



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_value
(scroll down for the list)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Values_in ... _Strengths
(scroll down for the list)


Meaning of life
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meaning_of_life
(scroll down for the list)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_human_needs
(scroll down for the table)


http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/1 ... SYeKQTE%3D


http://www.refugeofthewomb.com/wp-conte ... ds.jpg.pdf







SECULAR GRACES pinched from the NSS Newslines & internet

From Reginald Le Sueur
To the Farmers and Growers,
To the Butchers and Bakers,
To the Cooks and the Caterers ;
--we give thanks for this meal.
++++++++

From BHA website:
“Let us think thrice while we are gathering here for this meal. First, let us think of the people we are with today, and make the most of the pleasure of sharing food and drink together. Then, let us think of the people who made the food and drink and brought it to us, who serve us and wait on us, and who clear up and clean up after us. Finally, let us think of all the people all over the world, members with us in the human family, who will not have a meal today.”
++++++++

(Nicolas Walter)
“Good food, good meat, Sit down, let’s eat”.
++++++++

(Myron Morris)
“For this food we about to receive,
We thank those who produced it,
And those who transported it.
We thank those who prepared it,
And those who serve it,
And those who clean it after us.
Let us now sit down and enjoy it”.


++++++++
By Paul Diamond
Some years ago a woman wrote to Ann Landers. The letter writer told how she and her husband were atheists, though they didn't make a big deal about it. At a family gathering in another state her husband was asked to say grace at dinner. He mumbled something off and let it go at that. The woman wanted Ms. Landers to tell her how to deal with this in the future without compromising their principals. Ms Landers said to pass it off, to say, "Let cousin Lem do it,” or something to that effect.

That column inspired me to compose a 'Non-Believers Grace.' I sent it to Ann Landers but, to no surprise, she never responded. I share it here for humanists and freethinkers this Thanksgiving.

A Non-Believers Grace

I offer my deepest appreciation and my most profound apologies to the plants and animals whose lives were forfeit for our good health this day.

We give thanks to the ranchers and the farmers, their workers and their hands whose skill, sweat and toil have brought forth this bounty from the Earth.

We are grateful to the workers in the fields who pick our food, the workers in the plants where our food is processed, the teamsters who carry it to market and the stockers and the checkers who offer it up for our selection.

We are particularly appreciative for those at this table who have prepared this food with love and affection for our enjoyment and nourishment this day.

We remember fondly those who the miles and circumstance keep from joining us today as we remember those who are no longer with us and are grateful for the time we have shared with them.

We enjoy the warmth and fellowship that surrounds this gathering as we share the fervent hope that people the world over can share the good fortune, warm feeling and conviviality that embraces this gathering.

Thank you.




++++++++
We are thankful for the food on this table
We are thankful for this time together
Our thoughts go out to family and friends
We hope that they are safe and well
Let's eat/dive in.

++++++++
Earth we thank you for our food,
For work and play and all that's good,
For wind and rain and sun above,
But most of all for those we love.
posted by McIntaggart at 3:39 AM on August 24, 2005 [2 favorites]

++++++++
And a short meal gatha:
"We receive this food in gratitude to all beings
Who have helped to bring it to our table,
And vow to respond in turn to those in need
With wisdom and compassion."

++++++++
Personally I like the idea of contemplating how much went into providing the food.
posted by mendel at 4:43 AM on August 24, 2005 [1 favorite]




++++++++
My son learned this one in his Montessori school (natch), and we use it quite a bit in our agnostic home:
I am thankful for green grass under me (I am thankful/grateful )
I am thankful for blue skys over me (I am thankful/grateful )
I am thankful for good friends beside me
I am thankful for good food in front of me
and peace all over the world.
posted by Scoo at 7:09 AM on August 24, 2005

++++++++
"Thank you Chicken for your meat"
posted by daver at 9:53 AM on August 24, 2005
++++++++
good food, good meat, good vegetable, thank all those whose made it possible, let's eat/dive in.

++++++++
We thanks all animals and plants whose have died to give us food.
Let us eat consciously, resolving by our work to pay the debt of our existence.

++++++++

Also addressed to Nobody In Particular, I've said:
For the meal we are about to eat,
for those that made it possible,
and for those with whom we are about to share it,
we are thankful.

++++++++
For bacon, eggs, and buttered toast
Who eats the fastest gets the most!
Rain

++++++++
Earth who gives to us this food
Sun who makes it ripe and good
Dear Earth, dear Sun, by you we live
Our loving thanks to you we give.

++++++++
submitted by The Reverend Nancy Robinson:
Words Fit for a Feast

We celebrate this occasion
with food from the earth.
May it fill us with fellowship
and add to our mirth.

++++++++
“Before we enjoy this celebration meal, let us think for a moment of three things:
Firstly let us be mindful of those in our human family who will not be eating today.
Secondly let us be aware all our fellow human beings who made this feast possible. Those who grew, transported and made our meal, and those who serve and clean up after us.
Finally, let us make the most of the grand company we share today. May we leave this table fulfilled in body, mind and heart.”


++++++++
Steveroot
Nov 28, 2013 at 4:27 pm
That wasn’t meant to be an “offering”… just an observation.
Here’s a Thanksgiving secular grace I cooked up for tonight’s dinner:

We are grateful for the presence of those we love, for all the events and circumstances
which have made it possible for us to be here.

We are thankful for this food, for those who planted, grew, provided and prepared it.
We stand in awe-struck gratitude for the countless millions of stars which, by exploding,
provided the elements which make up everything we are and all we know.

We hope that, in the fullness of time, all peoples everywhere will have the bounty we are
grateful for today.

Amen.
Steve


++++++++




http://www.hsq.org.au/About/Humanism/
http://www.hsq.org.au/

Humanist Ethics

Living as a Humanist

Humanism as a life stance is comprehensive touching on every part of our lives, for those who call themselves Humanists it provides meaning, purpose and a framework for making ethical life choices. Most Humanists would indentify with at least some of the following principles and elements:

1. Humanism is a naturalistic philosophy and thus rejects belief in supernatural beings or principles.

2. Humanists rely on the scientific method, reasoning and critical thinking to form beliefs and opinions. We hold that gaining knowledge is a continuing process reliant upon observation/investigation/research, evaluation and revision.

3. We uphold the right to individual freedom, autonomy and privacy, so long as the rights of others are respected.

4. We consider other members of the human family as equal in dignity and value.

5. We believe we should act in a fair, just and honest way towards others, respecting their right to live peaceful, healthy and productive lives.

6. Humanists hold that a democratic and secular government is best suited to respecting the pluralistic and diverse nature of our society and fostering individual freedom.

7. We are committed to the use of reasoned argument and peaceful adjudication in settling conflict.

8. We oppose discrimination based on gender, sex, race, ethnicity or system of belief.

9. Many Humanists believe that whenever possible we should endeavour to minimise the suffering of animals.

10. We recognise the importance of sustaining the natural ecosystem and protecting the biosphere and environment from degradation and destruction.


++++++++



The following ethical principles should in general be promoted:

1. Abstaining from conduct injurious to life and the physical well-being of persons.
2. Abstaining from the theft and the damaging of property of others
3. Abstaining from sexual violence and misconduct
4. Abstaining from falsehood, fraud and deception
5. Abstaining from drunkenness, narcotics, mind bending drugs and gambling
6. Fidelity: Keep your promises and agreements

7. Life is all about reducing/avoiding pain & suffering, and find more pleasure, happiness for yourself & others too if possible
8. 'Treat other people as you'd want to be treated in their situation;
don't do things you wouldn't want to have done to you.'
Humanism, British Humanist Association, 1999 CE

9. 'If it harms no one/none, do what you will.'
The Wiccan Rede, 1975 CE

10. 'Do as you would be done by.'
Global saying

11. "Hard ethical decisions are not about whether harm will happen, but about where it will fall." The Pagan Federation


12. "Question everything"

13. "All our beliefs are subject to change in the face of new evidence, including these."
"Be open-minded and be willing to alter your beliefs with new evidence."

“Humanism recognises that reliable knowledge of the world and ourselves arises through a continuing process of observation, evaluation and revision.”

14. "Combined, freedom from pain and freedom from fear are happiness in its highest form"

15. The Golden Rule has been part of the teachings of many societies and religions, as well as Humanism. There are different versions of it but they all mean the same thing. These are some of them:

· Do as you would be done by.
· Treat other people as you would like to be treated yourself.
· Don’t treat others as you wouldn’t like to be treated.
· You should always ask yourself what would happen if everyone did what you are doing

16. Free thinking

17. Balance personal rights with social duties (Balance your personal interests with community interests)


++++++++


Other values

Free thinking
science & the arts (singing/dancing ...etc)
meritocracy
nobody perfect
to enrich life
to serve life
dependability
reliability
logic/scientific method/evidence/reasoning/rationality
emotional intelligence
social intelligence
cognitive intelligence
problems solving skills
planning
support sex education for the under 16
quality of life

++++++++

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_humanism

(scroll down for the list)


Council for Secular Humanism

According to the Council for Secular Humanism, within the United States, the term "secular humanism" describes a world view with the following elements and principles:[8]

.Need to test beliefs – A conviction that dogmas, ideologies and traditions, whether religious, political or social, must be weighed and tested by each individual and not simply accepted by faith.

.Reason, evidence, scientific method – A commitment to the use of critical reason, factual evidence and scientific method of inquiry in seeking solutions to human problems and answers to important human questions.

.Fulfillment, growth, creativity – A primary concern with fulfillment, growth and creativity for both the individual and humankind in general.

.Search for truth – A constant search for objective truth, with the understanding that new knowledge and experience constantly alter our imperfect perception of it.

.This life – A concern for this life (as opposed to an afterlife) and a commitment to making it meaningful through better understanding of ourselves, our history, our intellectual and artistic achievements, and the outlooks of those who differ from us.

.Ethics – A search for viable individual, social and political principles of ethical conduct, judging them on their ability to enhance human well-being and individual responsibility.

.Justice and fairness – an interest in securing justice and fairness in society and in eliminating discrimination and intolerance.[27]

.Building a better world – A conviction that with reason, an open exchange of ideas, good will, and tolerance, progress can be made in building a better world for ourselves and our children.

A Secular Humanist Declaration was issued in 1980 by the Council for Secular Humanism's predecessor, CODESH. It lays out ten ideals: Free inquiry as opposed to censorship and imposition of belief; separation of church and state; the ideal of freedom from religious control and from jingoistic government control; ethics based on critical intelligence rather than that deduced from religious belief; moral education; religious skepticism; reason; a belief in science and technology as the best way of understanding the world; evolution; and education as the essential method of building humane, free, and democratic societies.[28]





++++++++

http://www.religionnews.com/2013/11/27/ ... nksgiving/
(scroll down for the list)

Grateful without God: A secular Thanksgiving

(scroll down for the list)



""But since Kaiser began identifying as an atheist in college, her mother has introduced “Quaker grace” at the Thanksgiving table — a moment of silence in which Kaiser says she tries to clear her mind and enjoy the presence of those she loves.

“I really like that,” Kaiser said. “It seems a lot more open and accepting than a lot of traditions.”


“An Atheist Benediction” by Adam Lee


“As we come together to share this meal, let us first remember how it came to us and be thankful to the people who made it possible.

This food was born from the bounty of the Earth, in warm sunlight, rich earth and cool rain.

May it nourish us, in body and mind, and provide us with the things that are good for living.

We are grateful to those who cultivated it, those who harvested it, those who brought it to us and those who prepared it.

May its consumption bring about the pleasures of friendship, love and good company.

And as we partake of this food in each other’s company,

as what was once separate from all of us becomes part of each of us,

may we also remember what we have in common and what brings us all together.

May this sharing of food foster peace and understanding among us,

may it bring us to the recognition that we depend on each other for all the good we can ever hope to receive,

and that all the good we can hope to accomplish rests in helping others in turn.

May it remind us that as we reach out to others to brighten their lives,

so are our lives brightened in turn.”

From Jennifer Beahan:

“We give thanks to Nature for all it has provided us.

For Family and Friends who walk with us throughout the years.

We give thanks for those who have touched our hearts and made us smile.

We give thanks to those who have alleviated suffering,

Who have championed a cause,

For those who have resisted unjust laws,

Who have fought against oppression and injustice, and have fought for the freedoms we enjoy.

We give thanks for those who have sacrificed their lives to make our world a better place to be.

We give thanks for those who have advanced our understanding of medicine and science.

Who have helped explain the workings of the Universe.

We give thanks to those who have applied paint to canvas in a way that stirs feelings deep within us,

Who have composed songs which make our spirits soar,

To all the people – past, present and future – who strive to better our world and make life worth living, to these people, we give our highest praise and our endless thanks.” ""





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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_ethics

(scroll down for the list)


Examples of secular ethical codes

Humanist Manifestos

The Humanist Manifestos are three manifestos, the first published in 1933, that outline the philosophical views and stances of humanists. Integral to the manifestos is a lack of supernatural guidance.

Girl Scout law[edit]The Girl Scout law is as follows:

I will do my best to be
honest and fair,
friendly and helpful,
considerate and caring,
courageous and strong, and
responsible for what I say and do,

and to

respect myself and others,
respect authority,
use resources wisely,
make the world a better place, and
be a sister to every Girl Scout.[5]

United States Naval Academy honor concept[edit]"Midshipmen are persons of integrity: They stand for that which is right.

They tell the truth and ensure that the full truth is known. They do not lie.

They embrace fairness in all actions. They ensure that work submitted as their own is their own, and that assistance received from any source is authorized and properly documented. They do not cheat.

They respect the property of others and ensure that others are able to benefit from the use of their own property. They do not steal."[6]

Minnesota Principles[edit]The Minnesota Principles were proposed "by the Minnesota Center for Corporate Responsibility in 1992 as a guide to international business activities":

1.Business activities must be characterized by fairness. We understand fairness to include equitable treatment and equality of opportunity for all participants in the marketplace.

2.Business activities must be characterized by honesty. We understand honesty to include candor, truthfulness and promise-keeping.

3.Business activities must be characterized by respect for human dignity. We understand this to mean that business activities should show a special concern for the less powerful and the disadvantaged.

4.Business activities must be characterized by respect for the environment. We understand this to mean that business activities should promote sustainable development and prevent environmental degradation and waste of resources.[7]

Rotary Four-Way Test[edit]The Four-Way Test test is the "linchpin of Rotary International's ethical practice." It acts as a test of thoughts as well as actions. It asks, "Of the things we think, say, or do":

1.Is it the truth?
2.Is it fair to all concerned?
3.Will it build goodwill and better friendships?
4.Will it be beneficial to all concerned?[1]

Military codes[edit]See also: Ranger Creed

As the United States Constitution prohibits the establishment of a government religion, US military codes of conduct typically contain no religious overtones.

West Point Honor Code[edit]The West Point honor code states that "A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do." The non-toleration clause is key in differentiating it from numerous other codes.[



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http://www.bedshumanists.org.uk/node/2

(scroll down for the list)


Humanists Aims

1. To enable people of like mind to meet, socialise and share common interests.

2. To promote a rationalist and scientific approach to the resolution of the worlds great issues in an open and tolerant society.

3. To encourage society to question superstitious belief and any related customs which damage or undermine our society (e.g. sectarianism, indoctrination and intimidation).

4. To work towards the ending of religious bias in the media, in law and in government, and the ending of religious indoctrination in schools.

5. To represent Humanist (BH) opinion throughout the UK area to local politicians, the local media, and the general public

6. To promote the development of Humanism throughout society through education and free and open discussion and debate.

7. To support the wider aims of Humanists everywhere through the British Humanist Association (BHA)

8. To defend the rights of those who risk intimidation and violence from religious groups when they criticise religions or religious practices.

9. To defend those who suffer intolerance and discrimination because of race, gender, social and economic class, age, sexuality, disability or philosophy.

10. To encourage respect for other living things in our World based on the understanding that other animals we share our world with are not things, but fellow creatures who can suffer if treated with cruelty.

11. To recognise that we share our planet with all living people and all our foreseeable descendants, and accordingly to exercise and encourage responsible stewardship of all natural resources.

++++++++++++++++++



Table discussion

What is a Humanist Group for?
• An alternative church? • A secularist pressure group? • A talking shop?
• A pillar of the community? • A community hub? • Humanist/atheist evangelism?

What are its functions and what can we learn from our competitors?
• A community for the non-religious? • Forum for public debate? • Library?
• Chaplaincy and counselling/pastoral services? • Ceremonies?
• Courses on human flourishing (a ‘school of life’?) • Youth group?
• Charity fundraising? • Food bank? • To counter evangelism?
• “Celebration of life”? • Choirs, singing and readings? • Socialising?
• Facilitating the teaching of Humanism in schools (eg via RE)?
• Inclusion in Remembrance services?

What ‘infrastructure’ does a Humanist group need?
• Mission statement • Aims • Constitution and membership structure
• Affiliation/partnership with BHA • Somewhere to meet • A committee
• A programme of events • Promotional leaflets • Regular newsletter or bulletin
• Website, facebook etc • A Humanist course • Trained leaders? • A building?
• A gazebo/tent? • GRAM • International links/twinning
• Links with ‘kindred spirits’ (Unitarians, liberal Jews, Quakers, atheist groups, skeptics, Fabians, science groups, green groups, student humanist groups)

• Dialogue (aka ‘interfaith’)

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#273 Postby coffee » April 11th, 2016, 7:53 pm

Had just tidied up some loose stuffs from my last post but you can still find some new things/values here below.

Accountability
Animal compassion
Charity/giving
Clean air & water
Cognitive intelligence

Comfort
Communion with nature
Confidence
Conflict resolution
Debating

Dependability, reliability
Dreams/visions
Education/skills
Emotional intelligence
Environmental friendly

Evidence-based practice
Exercise
Fellowship, friendship
Finite resource-finite empathy
Free thinking 20

Freedom of expression/speech
Generosity
Good economic
Green issues awareness
Growth, progress

Happiness
Honouring
Humility, forgiveness
Hygiene/cleanliness
Imagination

Logic/rationality/reasoning
Long-term perspective
Meritocracy
Nobody is perfect
Passion

Planning
Problems solving skills
Promise/agreement- keeping
Quality of life
Reducing pain/suffering 40

Repair/reconciliation
Resource stability
Risks management
Risks reduction
Safety boundaries

Safety net, nhs
Science, r&d
Scientific method
Self-reliance
Shared power/democracy

Social intelligence
Solidarity
Support sex education
Support/help
The arts, music, dance...etc.

The internet
To enrich life
Tolerance
Transparency, openness 59

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#274 Postby coffee » April 18th, 2016, 7:06 pm

Let steal these ideas/values as well

June, 1997 - Basic Human Needs
https://www.itstime.com/jun97.htm

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#275 Postby coffee » April 29th, 2016, 8:54 am

I would like to add two more values to the above lists

common sense
strategy for humanists/atheists power :D

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Alan H
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#276 Postby Alan H » April 29th, 2016, 10:20 am

coffee wrote:I would like to add two more values to the above lists

common sense
strategy for humanists/atheists power :D
The problem with common sense is that it's not very common! But there is a bigger problem there in that our common sense come pre-loaded with a whole host of biases, most of which we will be unaware of. And what may be common sense to one may not be common sense to someone else.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#277 Postby coffee » April 29th, 2016, 10:36 am

The problem with common sense is that it's not very common! But there is a bigger problem there in that our common sense come pre-loaded with a whole host of biases, most of which we will be unaware of. And what may be common sense to one may not be common sense to someone else.
Alan Henness


It may not be agreed by everyone but if it agree by most people, that will be enough for me.
But I am still happy even if it not agree by most people, I tend to look/drawn to people with logic.


Here is the definition of common sense

https://www.google.co.uk/?ion=1&espv=2#q=common%20sense

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Alan H
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#278 Postby Alan H » April 29th, 2016, 11:03 am

Your link was just to a Google search for 'common sense' - was there one meaning in particular? But if you define it as something that would be agreed by most people, it's simply a fallacious appeal to popularity - it could be right, but just because many or most people believe it does not make it so. If you were to ask everyone in the world whether a supernatural entity created the universe, I suspect most would say yes. Does that make it common sense for everyone then?
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#279 Postby coffee » April 29th, 2016, 11:12 am

If you were to ask everyone in the world whether a supernatural entity created the universe, I suspect most would say yes. Does that make it common sense for everyone then?


It think this is more about fact/logic rather than common sense, though I can't think of example at the moment. For your example, logic and fact say no.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#280 Postby coffee » May 4th, 2016, 9:54 am

Here could be another controversial values/tools to add to the above lists but hopefully people will use it with humanist/atheist contexts

sensible
sensibility

---------------

I wonder if anyone would add these lists of values to the curriculum for the nonreligious people so that we have our own values taught which is a lot kinder than the the old fashion religious scripture.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#281 Postby coffee » May 12th, 2016, 6:48 pm

Here is another value/tool to add to the above lists

To improve life


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