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Atheist school's values & ethics

For discussions related to education and educational institutions.
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Dave B
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#221 Postby Dave B » June 9th, 2014, 11:23 am

Latest post of the previous page:

Alan H wrote:
Dave B wrote:filed them for suture reference.
Is that so you can stitch them all together? :D
Doh!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#222 Postby coffee » June 10th, 2014, 9:21 am

Thanks for the links, Coffee, filed them for suture reference.


Thanks Dave, I enjoy doing it.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#223 Postby coffee » June 14th, 2014, 10:33 am

The earth have limited resource therefore we do not have infinite empathy as a result everybody have to support this

http://www.populationmatters.org/?utm_s ... m_content=

including concerning for the uk population.

=========
'Do what you will, as long as it harms none'.


"Hard ethical decisions are not about whether harm will happen, but about where it will fall."

From The Pagan Federation website

=========

This also good, I should have included in earlier post

http://humanismforschools.org.uk/teachi ... heet4a.pdf

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Fia
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#224 Postby Fia » June 14th, 2014, 4:14 pm

Re graces: many years ago I was asked to write one for a wedding feast. I'd come across the ones Coffee posted and came up with this:

“Before we enjoy this celebration meal, let us think for a moment of three things:
Firstly let us be mindful of those in our human family who will not be eating today.
Secondly let us be aware all our fellow human beings who made this feast possible. Those who grew, transported and made our meal, and those who serve and clean up after us.
Finally, let us make the most of the grand company we share today. May we leave this table fulfilled in body, mind and heart.”

If anyone wants use use it, feel free.
If crediting me is necessary - all readings in any of my Celebrancy work are always credited as I think that's important in that context - me pls PM me for my real name :)

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#225 Postby coffee » June 26th, 2014, 9:31 am

“Before we enjoy this celebration meal, let us think for a moment of three things:
Firstly let us be mindful of those in our human family who will not be eating today.
Secondly let us be aware all our fellow human beings who made this feast possible. Those who grew, transported and made our meal, and those who serve and clean up after us.
Finally, let us make the most of the grand company we share today. May we leave this table fulfilled in body, mind and heart.”

If anyone wants use use it, feel free.
If crediting me is necessary - all readings in any of my Celebrancy work are always credited as I think that's important in that context - me pls PM me for my real name



Thanks for that Fia.
===========

The following link is useful for parents but can also be apply to adult too.

Basic Human Emotional Needs

http://eqi.org/needs.htm

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#226 Postby coffee » July 5th, 2014, 10:43 am

"Loyalty
Some relationships — husband-wife, employer-employee, citizen-country — create an expectation of allegiance, fidelity and devotion. Loyalty is a responsibility to promote the interests of certain people, organizations or affiliations. This duty goes beyond the normal obligation we all share to care for others.

Limitations to loyalty. Loyalty is a tricky thing. Friends, employers, co-workers and others may demand that we rank their interests above ethical considerations. But no one has the right to ask another to sacrifice ethical principles in the name of a special relationship. Indeed, one forfeits a claim of loyalty when he or she asks so high a price for maintaining the relationship.

Prioritizing loyalties. So many individuals and groups make loyalty claims on us that we must rank our loyalty obligations in some rational fashion. For example, it’s perfectly reasonable, and ethical, to look out for the interests of our children, parents and spouses even if we have to subordinate our obligations to other children, neighbours or co-workers in doing so."

I you want to know where the above came from, google it.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#227 Postby coffee » July 7th, 2014, 10:10 am

Continue to my last post, you can find these on the internet by bing or google it.

"Safeguarding confidential information. Loyalty requires us to keep some information confidential. When keeping a secret breaks the law or threatens others, however, we may have a responsibility to "blow the whistle."

Avoiding conflicting interests. Employees and public servants have a duty to make all professional decisions on merit, unimpeded by conflicting personal interests. They owe ultimate loyalty to the public."

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#228 Postby coffee » July 13th, 2014, 12:17 pm

Another very good humanist definition

IF

.you respect the right of others to be different from you

.you accept the idea that we should work to improve the lives of human beings in the world, rather than relying on the idea of rewards in an after-life

.you recognise that we all have a part to play in furthering human happiness and progress

.you support the idea that moral codes should be based on careful thought, taking into account our knowledge of the world and our environment, rather than faith in some supernatural being

you are probably a humanist!


from Sheffield Humanists
http://www.sheffieldhumanists.org.uk/

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coledavis
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#229 Postby coledavis » July 13th, 2014, 1:56 pm

- no, I do not
- I do
- probably not all
- maybe

Guess I'm not a humanist. I'll stick with atheism.
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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#230 Postby coffee » July 17th, 2014, 9:47 am

Why are values important

I thought the following definition are helpful

http://valuesalliance.net/about-uk-valu ... ut-values/


Values

What are values?
For us…

■Values are the things that are important to us
■They are deeply held principles that guide our choices and behaviours and influence our emotions
■They help define who we are, what we believe and how we live.
Values operate at many levels. Our focus is:

■Personal
■Organisational
■Societal


Why are values important to us personally?
For us, they help to provide

■A sense of clarity, authenticity, empowerment, self-control, choice and self-worth
■More meaning to life
■A foundation for effectiveness, happiness, fulfilment and success
■Improved personal, emotional, spiritual and physical wellbeing
■A compass for life, guiding decision-making, communication and behaviour
■A way to keep our behaviours consistent with what we believe to be important
■A means to portray a consistent view to others of who we are
■Enhanced personal and work relationships.


Why are values important to organisations?
For us, they help provide

■Encouragement of appropriate and consistent behaviours in support of the organisation’s purpose
■A consistent, desirable, recognisable and predictable culture
■A clear framework for decision making
■A sense of authenticity and identity that enables customer choice.
…..and deliver beneficial long-term outcomes, such as:

■A more consistent customer experience
■Employee attraction, motivation, fulfilment, loyalty and retention
■Increased productivity and achievement of organisational aims
■Better relationships with all stakeholders
■Improved collaboration and sustainability.

Why are values important to society?
For us they help provide

■A framework for members’ behaviour and interactions
■Happier communities, in which people relate better to each other and focus more on the common good
■A happier and more sustainable society with greater understanding, choice, consistency, openness and collaboration
■Enhanced emotional, spiritual and physical health and wellbeing
■A better alignment between the interests of its members and its government
■An improved balance between the need to serve oneself and others in society.

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#231 Postby coffee » July 21st, 2014, 9:58 am

I like this extract from the following link
http://richarddawkins.net/2014/07/how-c ... nce-exist/

"To the non-philosopher, this translates as reducing the moral principles we wish our societies to be guided by to the most basic sets they can possibly be – however we wish this to look – and then using reason and science to build consistent moral rules, and make consistent moral decisions based on these most basic of principles. For example, we might look at our current principles about murder/violent crime and then reduce them to a basic principle that suffering and death should be avoided wherever possible. From there we would judge whether our laws were rationally consistent with what we socially agreed."

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coledavis
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#232 Postby coledavis » July 21st, 2014, 6:00 pm

"For example, we might look at our current principles about murder/violent crime and then reduce them to a basic principle that suffering and death should be avoided wherever possible. From there we would judge whether our laws were rationally consistent with what we socially agreed."

Well we might. I think Jo Stalin tried. He wanted to reduce the possibilities of people committing murder or violent crime (against himself), essentially avoiding suffering and death very effectively by consistently jugging the people. What's a bit of murder and violent crime when we've socially agreed it?
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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#233 Postby coffee » July 22nd, 2014, 9:41 am

Hi coledavis,

I am sure I understand your question but I would say all murder and voilent crime except self defence.

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coledavis
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#234 Postby coledavis » July 22nd, 2014, 11:26 am

The word self-defence seems self-evident. Yes, in the case of defending oneself from hooligans, yes in defending the world against Nazis. Take a look at the current Israel/Palestine situation and the definition seems awfully less tangible. Take into account some claims made by white minorities in the UK, etc etc. Social agreement is a tenuous, changeable thing, assuming such a consensus ever exists. The state itself rests on an arguable consensus, legitimacy tacitly agreed by the currently alive, maybe by future citizens and generally by the long dead.
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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#235 Postby coffee » July 23rd, 2014, 10:11 am

It should be " I am not sure..." in my last post.
++++++++++++

In response to your last post is that if I ever get stuck I would look to to the humanists for their view or solution because they are usually unbiased before I make up my mind :)

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#236 Postby coffee » August 24th, 2014, 1:01 pm

The Oxford Declaration on Freedom of Thought and Expression
The 2014 World Humanist Congress, gathered in Oxford, UK, on 8-10 August 2014, adopted the following declaration on freedom of thought and expression:

http://iheu.org/oxford-declaration-on-f ... xpression/

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#237 Postby coffee » August 28th, 2014, 9:18 am

The following could be useful in other mentoring contexts too

5. YOU THE COACH

Willing or unwilling you are a model in the eyes of the children you coach. This model, faults and all, will be observed and imitated by those you coach.

For your influence to be positive and beneficial, you will need to pay attention to both increasing your gymnast’s performance level as well as their needs as persons.

There are many ways that a coach can pass on the pillars of character through activities and by the way the coach behaves.

Trustworthiness
. Be honest
. Don’t deceive, cheat or steal
. Be reliable--do what you say you’ll do
. Have the courage to do the right thing
. Build a good reputation
. Be loyal--stand by your family, friends, and country
Respect
. Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule
. Be tolerant of differences
. Use good manners, not bad language
. Be considerate of the feelings of others
. Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone
. Deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements
Responsibility
. Do what you are supposed to do
. Persevere: keep on trying!
. Always do your best
. Use self-control
. Be self-disciplined
. Think before you act--consider the consequences
. Be accountable for your choices
Fairness
. Play by the rules
. Take turns and share
. Be open-minded; listen to others
. Don’t take advantage of others
. Don’t blame others carelessly
Caring
. Be kind
. Be compassionate and show you care
. Express gratitude
. Forgive others
. Help people in need
Community
. Do your share to make your school, club and community better
. Cooperate
. Stay informed
. vote
. Be a good neighbor
. Obey laws and rules
. Respect authority
. Protect the environment

6. Incorporating Values into your classes and coaching style
. Use games in your warm-up and cool down that demonstrate the values.
. Talk about issues that are occurring in your community
. Use the song as the basic warm-up or cool down and then choose a word for the day


++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Loyalty

Some relationships — husband-wife, employer-employee, citizen-country — create an expectation of allegiance, fidelity and devotion. Loyalty is a responsibility to promote the interests of certain people, organizations or affiliations. This duty goes beyond the normal obligation we all share to care for others.

Limitations to loyalty. Loyalty is a tricky thing. Friends, employers, co-workers and others may demand that we rank their interests above ethical considerations. But no one has the right to ask another to sacrifice ethical principles in the name of a special relationship. Indeed, one forfeits a claim of loyalty when he or she asks so high a price for maintaining the relationship.

Prioritizing loyalties. So many individuals and groups make loyalty claims on us that we must rank our loyalty obligations in some rational fashion. For example, it’s perfectly reasonable, and ethical, to look out for the interests of our children, parents and spouses even if we have to subordinate our obligations to other children, neighbors or co-workers in doing so.

Safeguarding confidential information. Loyalty requires us to keep some information confidential. When keeping a secret breaks the law or threatens others, however, we may have a responsibility to "blow the whistle."

Avoiding conflicting interests. Employees and public servants have a duty to make all professional decisions on merit, unimpeded by conflicting personal interests. They owe ultimate loyalty to the public.


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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#239 Postby coffee » October 8th, 2014, 9:21 am

Here is another similar one but is interesting all the same

JUST NEEDS/NEEDS LIST
http://joyninja.com/wp-content/uploads/ ... -Needs.pdf
http://joyninja.com/handouts/

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#240 Postby coffee » October 31st, 2014, 9:58 am

I organised it into group for easy download



Amsterdam Declaration 2002

http://iheu.org/humanism/the-amsterdam-declaration/


Oxford Declaration on Freedom of Thought and Expression

http://iheu.org/oxford-declaration-on-f ... xpression/


Humanist Manifesto III

http://americanhumanist.org/Humanism/Hu ... ifesto_III


Vision and mission

http://iheu.org/about/vision-and-mission/


Meaning of life
(scroll down the page for interesting bit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meaning_of_life


Sex, Ethics, and Paganism (also good for humanists context too)

http://paganactivist.com/2013/10/28/sex ... -paganism/


Secular ethics
(scroll down the page for interesting bit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_ethics


Secular humanism
(scroll down the page for interesting bit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_humanism


Bedfordshire Humanists
Spreading the light of reason in Bedfordshire

http://www.bedshumanists.org.uk/node/2


Grateful without God: A secular Thanksgiving
(scroll down the page for interesting bit)

http://www.religionnews.com/2013/11/27/ ... nksgiving/

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coffee
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Re: Atheist school's values & ethics

#241 Postby coffee » November 6th, 2014, 9:25 am

Here is another grouping


The following ethical principles should in general be promoted:

Abstaining from conduct injurious to life and the physical well-being of persons.
Abstaining from the theft of property of others
Abstaining from sexual violence and misconduct
Abstaining from falsehood, fraud and deception
Abstaining from drunkenness, narcotics and mind bending drugs



http://home.alphalink.com.au/~jperkins/humoral.htm#ref

A basic set of eight such principles, together with brief annotations, has been suggested by Resnik:

Non-malificence: Do not harm yourself or other people.
Beneficence: Help yourself and other people.
Autonomy: Allow rational individuals to make free and informed choices.
Justice: Treat people fairly: treat equals equally, unequals unequally.
Utility: Maximize the ratio of benefits to harms for all people.
Fidelity: Keep your promises and agreements
Honesty: Do not lie, defraud, deceive or mislead.
Privacy: Respect personal privacy and confidentiality.


THE GOLDEN RULE from around the world
http://humanismforschools.org.uk/wp-con ... -Final.pdf

The Golden Rule has been part of the teachings of many societies and religions, as well as Humanism. There are different versions of it but they all mean the same thing. These are some of them:
· Do as you would be done by.
· Treat other people as you would like to be treated yourself.
· Don’t treat others as you wouldn’t like to be treated.
· You should always ask yourself what would happen if everyone did what you are doing.



Sexual relations should be based on mutual consent between adults.


“Do what you will, as long as it harms none/no one”.


"Hard ethical decisions are not about whether harm will happen, but about where it will fall."
From The Pagan Federation website


Finite resource => finite empathy



“Refusing to take unfair advantage”
http://ethics.ubc.ca/papers/invited/colero.html/

Principles of Personal Ethics
Personal ethics might also be called morality, since they reflect general expectations of any person in any society, acting in any capacity. These are the principles we try to instill in our children, and expect of one another without needing to articulate the expectation or formalize it in any way.

Principles of Personal Ethics include:

Concern for the well-being of others
Respect for the autonomy of others
Trustworthiness & honesty
Willing compliance with the law (with the exception of civil disobedience)
Basic justice; being fair
Refusing to take unfair advantage
Benevolence: doing good
Preventing harm



Principles of Professional Ethics
Individuals acting in a professional capacity take on an additional burden of ethical responsibility. For example, professional associations have codes of ethics that prescribe required behavior within the context of a professional practice such as medicine, law, accounting, or engineering. These written codes provide rules of conduct and standards of behavior based on the principles of Professional Ethics, which include:


Impartiality; objectivity
Openness; full disclosure
Confidentiality
Due diligence / duty of care
Fidelity to professional responsibilities
Avoiding potential or apparent conflict of interest


Even when not written into a code, principles of professional ethics are usually expected of people in business, employees, volunteers, elected representatives and so on.



Principles of Global Ethics
Global ethics are the most controversial of the three categories, and the least understood. Open to wide interpretation as to how or whether they should be applied, these principles can sometimes generate emotional response and heated debate.


Principles of Global Ethics include:

Global justice (as reflected in international laws)
Society before self / social responsibility
Environmental stewardship
Interdependence & responsibility for the ‘whole’
Reverence for place


Each of us influences the world by simply existing; and it is always wise to ‘think globally’. An added measure of accountability is placed on globally influential enterprises such as governments and transnational corporations. (Responsibility comes with power whether we accept it or not.) One of the burdens of leadership is to influence society and world affairs in a positive way. Can a person, nation or company truly be ‘successful’ while causing human suffering or irreparable environmental damage? A more modern and complete model of success also considers impact on humanity and the earth’s ecology.



Action for happiness
http://www.actionforhappiness.org/take-action


A good life without religion
http://agoodlifewithoutreligion.com/


Check out this website you might like it
Derbyshire Atheists, Secularists and Humanists
http://www.secularderby.org/


About curiosity and how it could be cultivated
http://www.thersa.org/__data/assets/pdf ... iosity.pdf


Alternatives to the Ten Commandments
You may find some of these are useful
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Comman ... ternatives


Reasons to join humanist group
http://lichfieldhumanistgroup.webs.com/whyjoinus.htm


khan academy is a great website for learning
http://www.khanacademy.org/


Free Online Courses
https://www.coursera.org/



Values in Action Inventory of Strengths

Classification of Strengths[edit]1.Wisdom and Knowledge: creativity, curiosity, judgement, love of learning, perspective
2.Courage: bravery, perseverance, honesty, zest
3.Humanity: love, kindness, social intelligence
4.Justice: teamwork, fairness, leadership
5.Temperance: forgiveness, humility, prudence, self-regulation
6.Transcendence: appreciation of beauty and excellence, gratitude, hope, humor, spirituality[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Values_in_ ... _Strengths



Quote of the Week “A humanist is someone who does the right thing even though she knows that no one is watching.” – Dick McMahan, New York humanist, 2004


That’s Humanism: Four animated videos about Humanism narrated by Stephen Fry

https://humanism.org.uk/thatshumanism/


Unmet Emotional Needs

http://eqi.org/uen1.htm#Unmet
http://eqi.org/top_10_emotional_needs.htm
http://eqi.org/needs.htm#Basic Human Emotional Needs
http://eqi.org/needs.htm


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