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Torture

Enter here to explore ethical issues and discuss the meaning and source of morality.
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Alan H
Posts: 22438
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Torture

#1 Postby Alan H » December 15th, 2014, 9:55 am

There has been a lot this week after the US revelations about torture, but this is interesting: The Humane Interrogation Technique That Works Much Better Than Torture
"The barbarous custom of having men beaten who are suspected of having important secrets to reveal must be abolished. It has always been recognized that this way of interrogating men, by putting them to torture, produces nothing worthwhile. The poor wretches say anything that comes into their mind and what they think the interrogator wishes to know." [Napoleon] wrote that in a letter in 1798.
Disclosure was 14 times more likely to occur early in an interrogation when a rapport-building approach was used. Confessions were four times more likely when interrogators struck a neutral and respectful stance. Rates of detainee disclosure were also higher when they were interrogated in comfortable physical settings.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
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Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Torture

#2 Postby Dave B » December 15th, 2014, 10:10 am

IIRC this is similar to some of the techniques actually used during the last war (forget the name of the book I read years ago), that worked both on the "common soldier" and the "dedicated officer" classes. Respect, drawing parallels, sharing similar experiences, discussing differences in an objective way etc. Took a good grasp of psychology and a lot of flexibility and patience to do it well though.

"Softly, softly catchee monkey" is actually good advice.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Torture

#3 Postby Alan H » December 16th, 2014, 5:40 pm

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Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Torture

#4 Postby Dave B » December 16th, 2014, 6:06 pm

"My justifiable means is your criminal action."

Just human nature . . .
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Altfish
Posts: 1821
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: Torture

#5 Postby Altfish » December 16th, 2014, 7:07 pm

Do you know, I think I could almost accept their excuses but there is one key issue....TORTURE HAS BEEN PROVEN NOT TO WORK !!!

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Alan H
Posts: 22438
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Torture

#6 Postby Alan H » December 16th, 2014, 7:11 pm

Altfish wrote:Do you know, I think I could almost accept their excuses but there is one key issue....TORTURE HAS BEEN PROVEN NOT TO WORK !!!
Is that 'evidence' thing again that so many politicians (worldwide) seem to think is a dirty word. But if you don't base decisions and actions of the best available evidence, what do you base it on?
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Altfish
Posts: 1821
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: Torture

#7 Postby Altfish » December 16th, 2014, 7:28 pm

Yes, why let evidence get in the way of dogma.

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Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Torture

#8 Postby Dave B » December 16th, 2014, 8:06 pm

Alan H wrote:
Altfish wrote:Do you know, I think I could almost accept their excuses but there is one key issue....TORTURE HAS BEEN PROVEN NOT TO WORK !!!
Is that 'evidence' thing again that so many politicians (worldwide) seem to think is a dirty word. But if you don't base decisions and actions of the best available evidence, what do you base it on?
Knowledge is power", but that only works long term when the "knowledge" is accurate and reliable.

Politicians (and generals) are mostly short term animals who rely on near robotic underlings to carry out their wishes.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
Posts: 22438
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Torture

#9 Postby Alan H » December 16th, 2014, 8:43 pm

Altfish wrote:Yes, why let evidence get in the way of dogma.
Or what politicians and others just know is best for us...
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?


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